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Buffer Now Offers Two-Step Authentication After Massive Hack

by • November 27, 2013 • Experts Talk, Other PlatformsComments (0)556

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After being hacked, exactly one month ago and the (very) public apology on their Facebook page, Buffer added a two-step authentication process, in order to avoid similar events in the future.

Bolstered with their customers and fans adamant support, Buffer released a statement with all you need to know about their latest security updates.

For the past few weeks, we have been focusing on making Buffer the safest, most secure way for you to manage and publish to your social media accounts.

Although still an optional feature, 2-step authentication is verifying that it’s you that you’re actually log in, by enabling the mobile channel through the sign in process. The same applies even if you’re on a business plan – you and your team will have to go through the same verification. In order to prevent any future information breach, Buffer encourages its users not to share their social media passwords with the rest of the team, but rather invite people as team members with assigned roles.

Two-step authentication is available through your standard Buffer Dashboard and can be completed through SMS, Google Authenticator App and QR Code. You only choose what suits you best and you’re good to go! Now each time you log in to your Buffer account, you’ll be asked to input another six-digit code from Google Authenticator or sent to you via text message.

In any case, it’s completely up to you whether you will use this new feature or not. If you opt for the latter, then Buffer has taken additional steps to reinforce their security and make sure that your precious information remains truly restricted.  According to their official blog post, the following actions have been taken, as well:

  • Resetting all  breached credentials after the hack
  • Encrypting email addresses stored in their database
  • Encrypting access tokens that lets Buffer post to users’ social media accounts
  • Having all Buffer team members change passwords and set up two-factor authentication (where possible) on their accounts for Google, Github, Stripe and Dropbox

Now that Buffer is a safer place,  would you use it?

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